Tag Archives: review

‘American Crime Story’ hits sophomore slump with ‘Versace’ (review)

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The evidence so impressively stacked up in “The People v. O.J. Simpson” was overwhelming. The conclusion was as obvious as it was inescapable. FX’s first “American Crime Story” season would be one incredibly tough act to follow.

Imagine trying to come up with a sophomore season as mesmerizing and grandly realized as the Emmy-winning “People v. O.J. Simpson.” Executive producer Ryan Murphy and his team apparently couldn’t imagine it, and so we get “The Assassination of Gianni Versace,” the terribly uneven second “American Crime Story,” premiering at 10 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 17.

Remember how the first season of HBO’s “True Detective” had critics and viewers reaching for the superlatives? We couldn’t wait for the second season. Here was a show destined to take crime-time storytelling to new heights.

Then, of course, we saw the second season of “True Detective” and realized, in truth, we could have waited. The drop-off between

Read more at: http://www.cleveland.com/tv-blog/index.ssf/2018/01/american_crime_story_hits_sophomore_slump_with_versace_review.html

‘American Crime Story’ hits sophomore slump with ‘Versace’ (review …

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The evidence so impressively stacked up in “The People v. O.J. Simpson” was overwhelming. The conclusion was as obvious as it was inescapable. FX’s first “American Crime Story” season would be one incredibly tough act to follow.

Imagine trying to come up with a sophomore season as mesmerizing and grandly realized as the Emmy-winning “People v. O.J. Simpson.” Executive producer Ryan Murphy and his team apparently couldn’t imagine it, and so we get “The Assassination of Gianni Versace,” the terribly uneven second “American Crime Story,” premiering at 10 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 17.

Remember how the first season of HBO’s “True Detective” had critics and viewers reaching for the superlatives? We couldn’t wait for the second season. Here was a show destined to take crime-time storytelling to new heights.

Then, of course, we saw the second season of “True Detective” and realized, in truth, we could have waited. The drop-off between

Read more at: http://www.cleveland.com/tv-blog/index.ssf/2018/01/american_crime_story_hits_sophomore_slump_with_versace_review.html

Blood on the Page by Thomas Harding review – the first British murder trial held in secret

Writing a true-crime book while the legal process is still unfolding is a high-stakes business. There’s no assurance of a neat outcome, or really any outcome at all. The goodies might turn out to be baddies, and all that righteous anger about a possible miscarriage of justice could leave you looking foolish. Trial dates slip, which means you’re deprived of a cracking finale in which grateful relatives embrace you on the courtroom steps while the police stand by looking sheepish. You could end up, in other words, with a sort of fretful trailing off …

All of which happens in Blood on the Page. Despite the title, which promises a “body in the library” plot from the golden age of detective fiction, Thomas Harding has written a real-life procedural about an uncharismatic crime involving unattractive people, which might, nonetheless, have important implications for us all. Or there again, it

Read more at: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jan/13/blood-on-page-murder-secret-trial-thomas-harding-review

TV Review: ‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’ on FX

Quite fittingly, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” begins with a sequence that feels timeless. The opening scenes of the first episode, “The Man Who Would Be Vogue,” are nearly devoid of dialogue, scored instead with a lush, operatic adagio that is reminiscent of an opulent, bygone age. The characters are introduced in ways that feel particularly timeless too: Gianni Versace (Edgar Ramírez), lord of his domain, wakes up in his sumptuous Miami Beach mansion — an Italian, baroque confection of luxury, staffed by dozens of uniformed servants and tanned, handsome men. Versace is the type of guy who takes his morning OJ on a silver tray, before reclining by the pool for a pre-lunch constitutional. His life is an incarnation of Italianate decadence, in a way that transcends his own time — the ’90s — to borrow, effortlessly, from luxury of yore.

Outside his haven, though,

Read more at: http://variety.com/2018/tv/reviews/assassination-of-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-fx-ryan-murphy-darren-criss-ricky-martin-penelope-cruz-review-1202658402/

TV Review: ‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime …

Quite fittingly, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” begins with a sequence that feels timeless. The opening scenes of the first episode, “The Man Who Would Be Vogue,” are nearly devoid of dialogue, scored instead with a lush, operatic adagio that is reminiscent of an opulent, bygone age. The characters are introduced in ways that feel particularly timeless too: Gianni Versace (Edgar Ramírez), lord of his domain, wakes up in his sumptuous Miami Beach mansion — an Italian, baroque confection of luxury, staffed by dozens of uniformed servants and tanned, handsome men. Versace is the type of guy who takes his morning OJ on a silver tray, before reclining by the pool for a pre-lunch constitutional. His life is an incarnation of Italianate decadence, in a way that transcends his own time — the ’90s — to borrow, effortlessly, from luxury of yore.

Outside his haven, though,

Read more at: http://variety.com/2018/tv/reviews/assassination-of-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-fx-ryan-murphy-darren-criss-ricky-martin-penelope-cruz-review-1202658402/

Product review: Audible app and podcasts

I’m in the car a lot, as I imagine most of us are these days. I have a long commute, and while I love cranking up the Taylor Swift tunes, sometimes a podcast or a book are better ways to keep a driver alert and engaged behind the wheel.

I’ve purchased some books on CD at Half-Price Books, and even though they’re used and therefore discounted, they’re kind of expensive. I recently downloaded the Audible smartphone application, because the first audio book is free. After that, the subscription is $14.99 for one book a month. To me, that’s really not worth it. I can get books much cheaper from Amazon, although I can’t read a paperback whilst driving. I’d say go for it if you are a truck driver or have a long road trip in your future, but for the daily commuter, it’s probably not worth your money.

Podcasts, however,

Read more at: http://www.sealynews.com/stories/product-review-audible-app-and-podcasts,77637

‘American Crime Story: Gianni Versace’ Review: Season 2 FX …

Season 2 of FX’s American Crime Story has big gloves shoes to fill. Ryan Murphy’s true-crime anthology kicked off in spectacular fashion with The People v. O.J. Simpson, which injected fresh drama into the infamous Trial of the Century on its way to nine Emmys. Two years later, ACS is finally back with The Assassination of Gianni Versace — debuting Wednesday, Jan. 17 at 10/9c — and though the new season does offer some excellent acting and a sumptuous visual flair, it falls short of the very high bar that O.J. set.

The 1997 murder of revered fashion designer Gianni Versace (Edgar Ramirez) at the

Read more at: http://tvline.com/2018/01/09/american-crime-story-review-season-2-fx-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-ryan-murphy/

Book review: What the Dead Know

I’m an avid reader and am currently reading three books but the one that is really capturing my attention is “What the Dead Know” by Laura Lippman.

I love the true crime genre, but I think I’ve read all the good ones. My absolute favorite author Ann Rule, a former Seattle policewoman who worked alongside Ted Bundy at a suicide crisis hotline in the early 1970s. I met Ann Rule at a book signing in Atlanta several years ago, and a picture of the two of us sits behind my desk in my office at The Sealy News. She penned more than 35 true crime novels, which is no simple feat. Because it’s non-fiction, it involves sitting in a courtroom for weeks or even months, interviewing family members – of both victim and suspect – and digesting thousands of pages of transcripts and law enforcement documents. That might be the coolest

Read more at: http://www.sealynews.com/stories/book-review-what-the-dead-know,77583

Movie Review: “I, Tonya” Rebrands Controversial Skater

The problem with so many biopics is that life usually doesn’t proceed with the convenient clarity of a movie script, with its causes and effects, its spelled-out exposition and shapely character arcs. How refreshing, then, that “I, Tonya” manages to elude claims of absolute veracity in its preamble: We’re informed that the film is “based on the irony-free, wildly contradictory, totally true interviews with Tonya Harding and Jeff Gilooly.”

Screenwriter Steven Rogers and director Craig Gillespie admit that their biopic is studded with conflicting stories, inconsistent memories and slippery truths. In its unorthodox, stylized, freewheeling manner, it manages to convey the messiness of life better than most biographies in recent memory.

7- Young Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie) and Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan) in I, TONYA, courtesy of NEON and 30WEST

Gillespie switches between genres and tones with a slick confidence, favoring an engrossing pop-cinema package

Read more at: https://bocamag.com/movie-review-tonya-rebrands-controversial-skater/