Tag Archives: manson

How do we reconcile Charles Manson’s influence on Hollywood?

Like most hypocritical people, I have an intermittent fascination with the sensationalistic true crime-y network shows that evaporate after a brief epiphany of how wrong it is to be watching said shows. Personally, I love works that explore the darkness and depths of a warped psyche. Where would art be if it didn’t take its inspiration from the admirable and the despicable?

During one of many squirm-inducing scenes in Rob Zombie’s second film, The Devil’s Rejects, one of the psychotic protagonists, Otis Diftwood, has bested a pair of men trying to escape his clutches. With his makeshift weapon — a bulky tree branch — in hand, he stands over one of his victims, chiding the man’s religious beliefs. With his long gray hair whipping against his blood-drenched face, Diftwood slowly pulls his hair back and matter-of-factly states, “I am the devil and I am here to do the devil’s work,” before

Read more at: https://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/how-do-we-reconcile-charles-mansons-influence-on-hollywood/Content?oid=13575640

How Charles Manson Got Under America’s Skin—For Nearly 50 Years

To understand why Charles Manson has remained such a riveting figure in American popular culture for five decades, it helps to go back to mid-April 1969, when Manson, then 34, called his three dozen or so followers together on the isolated Spahn Ranch outside Los Angeles.

It was several months before the notoriously gruesome murders of actress Sharon Tate and her friends, followed by the wealthy couple Leno and Rosemary LaBianca. But it was well after Manson had informed his ragtag flock of an imminent “Helter Skelter” race war—prophesized, he claimed, by the Bible and the Beatles—and began training them for combat. A few days earlier, officers from the county sheriff’s office had raided Spahn, confiscating stolen dune buggies and arresting some “Manson Family” cult members, though they were soon released on technicalities. Manson himself was away from the ranch and had avoided being taken into custody. But having spent much

Read more at: http://www.history.com/news/how-charles-manson-got-under-americas-skin-for-nearly-50-years

Why people obsess over Charles Manson and true crime

When Larry Brand found out Charles Manson had passed away on Sunday of last week, he says he felt nothing.

The screenwriter and director had spent months delving into the personal life and psychology of the notorious cult leader who orchestrated the brutal murder of Sharon Tate and six other people in Los Angeles in the 1960s. Manson’s death occurred just after the premiere of a new podcast he had been working on called Young Charlie, which explores Manson’s life in the lead-up to the murders.

“I think by the time he died, his legend had so outgrown him that I think his life or death became almost irrelevant,” said Brand. “I tried to understand and get invested at least as a writer in his emotional state. But I was trying to get into his head without him getting into my head.”

Brand got involved in the podcast

Read more at: https://www.vox.com/conversations/2017/11/27/16704574/charles-manson-true-crime-young-charlie

Why people obsess over Charles Manson and true crime – Vox

When Larry Brand found out Charles Manson had passed away on Sunday of last week, he says he felt nothing.

The screenwriter and director had spent months delving into the personal life and psychology of the notorious cult leader who orchestrated the brutal murder of Sharon Tate and six other people in Los Angeles in the 1960s. Manson’s death occurred just after the premiere of a new podcast he had been working on called Young Charlie, which explores Manson’s life in the lead-up to the murders.

“I think by the time he died, his legend had so outgrown him that I think his life or death became almost irrelevant,” said Brand. “I tried to understand and get invested at least as a writer in his emotional state. But I was trying to get into his head without him getting into my head.”

Brand got involved in the podcast

Read more at: https://www.vox.com/conversations/2017/11/27/16704574/charles-manson-true-crime-young-charlie

Editor’s Notebook: Our fascination with Manson and murderers

The death of Charles Manson last week resulted in a barrage of media accounts of all things Manson and his murderous family. You couldn’t turn on the television or radio without hearing another tale of Manson or murder.

As for Manson, I say good riddance. Charlie should have been executed decades ago. A court ruling on California’s death penalty saved him from the fate he deserved and allowed him to live out his life in a prison cell. Justice was not served.

Sometimes I wish America’s justice system was a little different. I’m all for innocent until proven guilty, but once murderers have been convicted, wouldn’t we all be better off if we just took them out behind the courthouse and shot them? No more life sentences. Why should taxpayers have to pay to feed, clothe and house men and women who took

Read more at: http://www.vvdailypress.com/news/20171125/editors-notebook-our-fascination-with-manson-and-murderers

Did Charles Manson Have a Long-Lost Grandson?

Why would someone want to be related to Charles Manson?

Jason Freeman is likely accustomed to that question. A 41-year-old oil rig worker and father of three from Florida, Freeman has long believed he is the mass murderer’s grandson, born in 1976 to Charles Manson, Jr.

Freeman tells PEOPLE he first learned about his purported infamous family history as a teen. In recent years, before Manson’s death Sunday at 83, he had pushed to have a relationship with one of the most reviled figures in United States history.

Freeman says he has talked to Manson by phone from prison for years, but PEOPLE was unable to verify his claims, and California corrections officials would not comment on the matter.

During one conversation, says Freeman, “He kept asking me what I wanted. ‘What do you want from me?’ I said, ‘I just want to get to know my grandfather.”

Read more at: http://people.com/crime/charles-manson-alleged-grandson-jason-freeman/

A look at Charles Manson, Unhinged Pop Culture Figure

Charles Manson, who died on Sunday at 83, has loomed large in American culture ever since a brutal killing spree by his gang of followers, called the Manson family, claimed the lives of the actress Sharon Tate and eight others in the summer of 1969.

Manson once dreamed of stardom, and he assembled a drug-fueled apocalyptic cult along the way. Like a 20th-century Jack the Ripper, his name evokes a legendary tale of violence that has inspired writers, filmmakers and others for decades.

Here is a look at Manson’s ties to pop culture before the killing spree and the Manson family’s endurance in the public imagination since.

Dreams of Stardom

Manson wanted to be a rock star, and one year before the killing spree the family briefly lived in the home of Dennis Wilson, the drummer for the Beach Boys. Manson hoped to parlay that friendship into a record deal, but their relationship soured

Read more at: http://whatsuppub.com/news/national/article_7b64e29e-cee6-11e7-b972-ff8d58d8a1e8.html

Five People Who Helped Get Justice for Manson’s Victims

That murderer from almost 50 years ago died this week, but he’s been talked about enough. Instead, we’d like to salute the memories of a few of the people whose obituaries noted that they played important roles in carrying out justice on behalf of his victims.

Richard Powell, who died earlier this year, was a longtime employee of the U.S. National Park Service, and it was as a ranger that he gathered evidence that led to the authorities finding and arresting Manson: “As a young ranger, his thorough investigation led to the discovery of the hideout of Charlie Manson, and the subsequent arrest of this notorious criminal. These actions have been chronicled in dozens of related books and articles and were a measure of his commitment to his work.”

Aaron Stovitz was the original prosecutor in the Manson Family’s trial, laying the groundwork for his successor to indict Manson:

Read more at: http://www.legacy.com/news/explore-history/article/five-people-who-helped-get-justice-for-mansons-victims

Music Journalist Legs McNeil Talks New Book on Charles Manson and the Dark Side of Late-’60s ‘Free Love’

Cult leader and convicted killer Charles Manson, who died on Sunday (Nov. 19) at the age of 83, built his own perverse mythology upon a foundation of occultism, race war conspiracy theories and, ultimately, murder. Yet in spite of his heinous actions, many of the reports surrounding Manson are inaccurate, the result of grotesque folklore being passed down through generations until it was accepted as fact.

Music journalist Legs McNeil — who co-authored 1996’s groundbreaking Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk with Gillian McCain — hopes to change that. For 20 years, he and McCain have been working on a book that documents the late-‘60s California music scene and Manson’s role in it, tentatively titled 69 — though McNeil grouses, “We might change the title because I think that asshole Quentin Tarantino just stole it.”

There’s no lack of Manson reading material already on the market — Vincent Bugliosi and Curt

Read more at: https://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/rock/8046160/legs-mcneil-talks-charles-manson-new-book-interview

Charles Manson’s Infectious Evil

A pop-cultural fixture—in life, in prison, and now in death—mass murderer and master manipulator Charles Manson embodied the evil underbelly of the free-loving 1960s. And from his conviction in 1971 for seven counts of murder, to his death Sunday at age 83, California kept him alive.

In her 1979 collection of essays The White Album, Joan Didion recalls late-’60s Los Angeles, “when the dogs barked every night and the moon was always full”—and, of the day after the gruesome Manson murders, “I remembered all of the day’s misinformation very clearly, and I also remember this, and wish I did not: I remember that no one was surprised.”

Born in Cincinnati to a hard-drinking teenage mother, a prostitute who went to prison for robbing a gas station when he was 5, he spent a rocky youth shifting among relatives’ homes, reform schools, and juvenile detention centers. He honed a

Read more at: http://www.weeklystandard.com/charles-mansons-infectious-evil/article/2010557