Tag Archives: blood

Blood on the Page by Thomas Harding review – the first British murder trial held in secret

Writing a true-crime book while the legal process is still unfolding is a high-stakes business. There’s no assurance of a neat outcome, or really any outcome at all. The goodies might turn out to be baddies, and all that righteous anger about a possible miscarriage of justice could leave you looking foolish. Trial dates slip, which means you’re deprived of a cracking finale in which grateful relatives embrace you on the courtroom steps while the police stand by looking sheepish. You could end up, in other words, with a sort of fretful trailing off …

All of which happens in Blood on the Page. Despite the title, which promises a “body in the library” plot from the golden age of detective fiction, Thomas Harding has written a real-life procedural about an uncharismatic crime involving unattractive people, which might, nonetheless, have important implications for us all. Or there again, it

Read more at: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jan/13/blood-on-page-murder-secret-trial-thomas-harding-review

Book Nook: Regional authors put new spin on ‘Cold Blood,’ Santa Claus

Amy Brashear’s debut book is titled “No Saints In Kansas.” She is a Fayetteville resident who was born in Russellville but grew up in a small town in Kansas just six miles from Holcomb, the town Truman Capote immortalize in “In Cold Blood.”

As a child, Brashear remembers the incident being spoken of in hushed tones. Later, she learned of the fate of the Clutter family from a childhood friend. This author has always been intrigued by true crime stories and growing up in the area made her intensely aware of the circumstances behind the Clutter murders.

Brashear tells the story as seen through the eyes of young Carly Flemming. She is the new girl in class and is struggling to fit in when a teacher asks her to help Nancy Clutter with her geometry. Nancy is the town’s sweetheart and has always made

Read more at: http://www.swtimes.com/entertainmentlife/20171205/book-nook-regional-authors-put-new-spin-on-cold-blood-santa-claus

In Cold Blood Detective’s Son Reflects on Brutal Case, Relationships with Capote and Harper Lee

Paul Dewey was just a boy in 1959 when his detective dad was assigned to investigate the brutal slayings of the Clutter family, who had been found bound and shot to death in their Holcomb, Kansas, farmhouse that November.

The crime — which stunned the tight-knit, trusting community — gained national attention, and eventually infamy, after author Truman Capote traveled there to research it for his 1966 book, In Cold Blood.

Capote’s non-fiction account, a bestseller of both wide acclaim and criticism (for its sometimes murky blend of factual reporting and fictional flourishes), soon became a 1967 film and is now thought of as a touchstone in America’s enduring fascination with true crime.

For the first time ever, in a new documentary, Paul Dewey is sharing his experiences growing up so close to the bloody case that inspired the book that inspired a genre.

“I was 9 when all this happened,”

Read more at: http://people.com/crime/in-cold-blood-detective-alvin-dewey-son-opens-up/

In Cold Blood Family Breaks Their Silence: Why They’re Speaking Out Now About Infamous Slayings

Long before Making a Murderer or Serial captivated audiences, there was In Cold Blood — Truman Capote’s non-fiction account of a Kansas family’s brutal farmhouse slaying in 1959, which gripped the nation and shattered its sense of security.

Capote’s 1966 book was a bestseller, garnering acclaim for its author and shining a spotlight on killers Perry Smith and Richard Hickock, who bound and shot four members of the Clutter family at their Holcomb, Kansas, home in November 1959.

Only the Clutters’ eldest daughters, Beverly and Eveanna, survived as they were staying elsewhere at the time.

Smith and Hickock were later convicted and put to death for the slayings, which they committed in the mistaken belief the family had thousands of dollars stashed in a safe. In reality, they left the house after the murders with binoculars, a radio and just $50 — and the bodies of their victims still inside.

Amid the fanfare and dizzying success

Read more at: http://people.com/crime/in-cold-blood-clutter-family-speaks-out-documentary/

In Cold Blood’s Clutter Family Speaks for First Time | PEOPLE.com

Long before Making a Murderer or Serial captivated audiences, there was In Cold Blood — Truman Capote’s non-fiction account of a Kansas family’s brutal farmhouse slaying in 1959, which gripped the nation and shattered its sense of security.

Capote’s 1966 book was a bestseller, garnering acclaim for its author and shining a spotlight on killers Perry Smith and Richard Hickock, who bound and shot four members of the Clutter family at their Holcomb, Kansas, home in November 1959.

Only the Clutters’ eldest daughters, Beverly and Eveanna, survived as they were staying elsewhere at the time.

Smith and Hickock were later convicted and put to death for the slayings, which they committed in the mistaken belief the family had thousands of dollars stashed in a safe. In reality, they left the house after the murders with binoculars, a radio and just $50

Read more at: http://people.com/crime/in-cold-blood-clutter-family-speaks-out-documentary/

In Cold Blood’s Clutter Family Speaks for First Time – People

Long before Making a Murderer or Serial captivated audiences, there was In Cold Blood — Truman Capote’s non-fiction account of a Kansas family’s brutal farmhouse slaying in 1959, which gripped the nation and shattered its sense of security.

Capote’s 1966 book was a bestseller, garnering acclaim for its author and shining a spotlight on killers Perry Smith and Richard Hickock, who bound and shot four members of the Clutter family at their Holcomb, Kansas, home in November 1959.

Only the Clutters’ eldest daughters, Beverly and Eveanna, survived as they were staying elsewhere at the time.

Smith and Hickock were later convicted and put to death for the slayings, which they committed in the mistaken belief the family had thousands of dollars stashed in a safe. In reality, they left the house after the murders with binoculars, a radio and just $50 — and the bodies of their victims still inside.

Amid the fanfare and dizzying success

Read more at: http://people.com/crime/in-cold-blood-clutter-family-speaks-out-documentary/

‘In Cold Blood’ murders revisited in new documentary

 (Courtesy of SundanceTV)

On November 15, 1959, Richard Hickock and Perry Smith entered the Holcomb, Kansas, home of Hebert Clutter, believing he kept as much as $10,000 in his safe.

There was about $50 in the house.

Consequently, the prominent farmer, his wife, and their two teenage children were all shot to death after being bound and gagged. The murders were chronicled in

Read more at: http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2017/11/17/in-cold-blood-murders-revisited-in-new-documentary.html

Infamous ‘In Cold Blood’ murders revisited in documentary

They were unconscionable murders that shocked the nation, spawned a best-selling book and continue to fascinate today.

Director Joe Berlinger (“Paradise Lost,” “Brother’s Keeper”) revisits the 1959 Holcomb, Kan., killings in the two-part “Cold Blooded: The Clutter Family Murders” (8 p.m. Nov. 18-19, SundanceTV).

The four-hour documentary tells the story of how Perry Edward Smith and Kansas City native Richard Eugene Hickock broke into the home of Herb and Bonnie Clutter searching for a safe that was rumored to contain $10,000.

The would-be thieves found no safe and murdered everyone present, including 15-year-old son Kenyon and 16-year-old daughter Nancy. The case was immortalized in the 1966 Truman Capote book “In Cold Blood.”

“The fact it happened in the Midwest is one of those things where there was a certain sense of innocence (shattered), but I think that sense of innocence pervaded the entire country at the time,” Berlinger said. “That was one

Read more at: http://www.kansascity.com/entertainment/article183501076.html

True-crime TV angle gives bite to blood-soaked ‘Applecart’

Casey Pollack (Brea Grant) is taking her family out for a winter weekend at a secluded cabin in the woods. Her loving husband, James (AJ Bowen), has been diagnosed with liver cancer, and she has booked this getaway because of the potential healing powers of the location. The explanation, which can only come from a movie plot, has something to do with mineral deposits, I think. The semantics of why they are there is not nearly as important as what unfolds next. 

Read more at: http://www.austin360.com/movies/true-crime-angle-gives-bite-blood-soaked-applecart/Y5hEAGBo9WUP5sNY0CCujP/

Lister launches Blood for Blood Club, new release

Lister launches Blood for Blood Club, new release

Special to The Star

Bestselling and award-winning mystery author Michael Lister has just launched the Blood for Blood Club—an outreach project that donates one of his John Jordan “Blood” books to anyone anywhere in the world willing to donate blood.

Lister will discuss his work, his blood drive and new books 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. ET Saturday at No Name Café in Port St. Joe.

“The worldwide need for blood is tremendous,” Lister said. “Every single second of every day, people around the world need blood transfusions to survive. And that need is growing by the second.”

That’s where the Blood for Blood Club comes in. Blood for Blood encourages readers to donate blood all around the world by giving great books to those who give.”

The Blood for Blood Club will give one of the books in Lister’s popular and acclaimed

Read more at: http://www.starfl.com/news/20170629/lister-launches-blood-for-blood-club-new-release