Category Archives: True Crime Documentary

Making A Murderer’s Dean Strang says true crime can be either ‘destructive’ or ‘thought-provoking’

SINCE MAKING A Murderer first aired in December 2015, US attorney Dean A Strang has been busy.

Having lost his anonymity after featuring in the Netflix documentary, his office has been batting at frequent media requests, he’s been asked to make countless guest appearances at universities across the world, including a guest lecture at the University of Limerick last year. This June, he’s to speak at the Dalkey Book Festival

Strang says taking part in the series had caused him to “think more broadly” about criminal justice issues, about whether justice is being served by the current system in the US, and to engage with other legal professionals from different disciplines and countries.

Even if you haven’t seen a single episode of Making A Murderer, the story is almost inescapable: Wisconsin man Steven Avery served 18 years in prison for the wrongful conviction of an attempted murder of a woman

Read more at: https://www.thejournal.ie/dean-strang-making-a-murderer-2-4643117-May2019/

Doc Edge: The documentaries you need to see at this year’s festival

Some of the year’s best documentaries from around the globe are about to arrive in Auckland and Wellington as part of the 14th annual Documentary Edge Film Festival.

Unless you flat out hate a documentary, there’s something for everyone in this year’s line-up. So what one(s) should you go and see?

We’ve narrowed it down to a top nine, but if none of these apply to you, check out the rest of the programme here.

READ MORE:
Documentary streaming service iwonder launches in New Zealand
New Zealand International Film Festival: Eight great documentaries worth checking out
Top 10 documentaries from the past 10 years

If you only go to one film this year, go and see… Honeyland

Filmed over the course of three years, Honeyland is a beautifully-shot and surprisingly funny film. Read more at: https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/film/112854900/doc-edge-the-documentaries-you-need-to-see-at-this-years-festival

Ted Bundy possible suspect in ’69 parkway murders, author claims

On June 2, 1969, the bodies of Elizabeth Perry, of Excelsior, Minnesota, and Susan Davis, of Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, were found 20 feet from each other in the “secluded underbrush” off the parkway just inside the boarder Egg Harbor Township, according to The Press of Atlantic City’s archives.

Read more at: https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/news/crime/breaking_crime_news/ted-bundy-possible-suspect-in-parkway-murders-author-claims/article_7fb03d9b-1595-517c-a4bb-35103b8a8114.html

New Netflix true crime series could be the best one yet

A new true crime documentary from Netflix looks like it could be the the most bizarre and gripping one they have released to date.

Killer Ratings will tell the story of a Brazilian TV host who allegedly ordered murders in order to boost his show’s ratings and is tipped to be ‘scarier than fiction’.

The seven=part series will focus on Wallace Souza, who catapulted to fame n Brazil when he hosted TV show Canal Livre, which broadcast in Manaus, a remote and lawless city surrounded by jungle in the heart of Brazil’s Amazon.

The show was a hit but its reputation was tarnished when it was claimed that Souza was only able to make it first to certain crime scenes because he had ordered the murders himself.

His former bodyguard accused him of being the head of a criminal organization.

In October 2009, Souza was charged with murder, drug-trafficking, intimidation of witnesses, illegal carrying of arms

Read more at: https://www.buzz.ie/movies-tv/new-netflix-new-true-crime-documentary-best-one-yet-327455

See What Game of Thrones‘s Ending Might Look Like If John Hughes Had Directed It

Documentaries have grown considerably more ambitious since Fred Ott’s Sneeze, an 1894 clip that documents the irritated sinus cavities of its subject in just five seconds. They can inspire, as in the case of 2019’s Academy Award-winning Free Solo, about bold mountain climber Alex Honnold. They can shine a light on cultural overachievers like Fred Rogers, the subject of 2018’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor? And they can parse political history, with films like 2003’s The Fog of War shedding light on decisions that shaped the world.

Other documentaries set out to chronicle true stories that, were they presented as a fictitious, might be hard for people to believe. We’ve profiled such films in previous lists, which you can find here, here, and here. If you’ve already made your way through those tales of cannibals, tragic love affairs, and twist-laden true

Read more at: http://mentalfloss.com/article/583881/game-of-thrones-finale-as-john-hughes-movie

John Seven | Viewer’s Discretion: Film, show probe dysfunctional family, wrongly accused man

’51 BIRCH STREET’ (APPLE, SUNDANCE)

Thank goodness for people who like to work out their problems in public, because they have single-handedly enlivened the dysfunctional family documentary genre, and I’m a sucker for those. In “51 Birch Street,” filmmaker Doug Block mourns the death of his mother and then is blindsided when his father decides to go live in Florida with the woman who had been his secretary 40 years before.

It starts out as an innocent effort to document his parents starting with their 50th wedding anniversary, but after his mother’s death and his father’s decision, Block begins to have suspicions about his father’s past and gets his sisters on camera to speculate along with him. Recounting the story of his family, and with the attitude you’d expect from someone who was much closer to his mother than his father, Block begins to paint a picture of their marriage from

Read more at: https://www.berkshireeagle.com/stories/john-seven-viewers-discretion-making-a-murderer-51-birch-street-probe-dysfunctional-family-wrongly-accused-man,574411

Fans Are Theorizing One Major Game of Thrones Character Actually Survived the Finale

Documentaries have grown considerably more ambitious since Fred Ott’s Sneeze, an 1894 clip that documents the irritated sinus cavities of its subject in just five seconds. They can inspire, as in the case of 2019’s Academy Award-winning Free Solo, about bold mountain climber Alex Honnold. They can shine a light on cultural overachievers like Fred Rogers, the subject of 2018’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor? And they can parse political history, with films like 2003’s The Fog of War shedding light on decisions that shaped the world.

Other documentaries set out to chronicle true stories that, were they presented as a fictitious, might be hard for people to believe. We’ve profiled such films in previous lists, which you can find here, here, and here. If you’ve already made your way through those tales of cannibals, tragic love affairs, and twist-laden true

Read more at: http://mentalfloss.com/article/583973/game-of-thrones-major-character-survived-finale-fan-theory

Local News, Fast Five: Nancy Nelson

Meet Nancy Nelson, a lifelong Idahoan and Hayden resident since 2010. She was born and raised in St. Maries and played on four state-champion volleyball teams during high school in the late ’80s and early ’90s. She graduated from the University of Idaho.

Generation:

Textbook Gen-Xer, raised on MTV, John Hughes movies and cynicism.

Career and community involvement:

I just reached the nine-year mark as an account manager with the Murray Group, an employee benefits consulting firm in Coeur dAlene. I also serve on the Long-Range Planning Committee for the Coeur dAlene School District, volunteer as a Regional Business Professionals of America judge, am a member of the National Association of Health Underwriters and will soon be a graduate of River City Leadership Academy Class of 2019.

Parental status:

Chauffer to an active son, Reid, who will be starting at Coeur d’Alene High Schoolin the fall.

1. What does an account manager with the Murray Group

Read more at: https://www.cdapress.com/local_news/20190524/fast_five_nancy_nelson

This week’s best home entertainment: from Black Monday to Good Omens

Black Monday

A feast of coke, shoulder pads and grotesque financial negligence as this comedy-drama winds the clock back to 1987 and explores the financial crisis. Andrew Rannells is Blair Pfaff, an outsider finding himself in the outrageous world of Wall Street; Don Cheadle is Mo Monroe, a wildly successful and even more wildly debauched trader.
Wednesday 29 May, 10.10pm, Sky Atlantic

Killer Ratings

A documentary that doubles as a compelling chunk of true crime and a canny critique of its morally grubby appeal. It tells the almost impossible to believe true story of Wallace Souza, a Brazilian cable news host who arranged a number of murders to boost his ratings.
From Friday 31 May, Netflix



Framed… Caleel Harris in When They See Us. Photograph: Atsushi Nishijima

When They See Us

Ava DuVernay follows up 13th, her excoriating documentary on the parallels between slavery and the US criminal justice system, with a drama that chimes with similar themes. Her focus is on the Central Park Five: the teens, four black and one Hispanic, wrongly imprisoned for the rape of a jogger in New York in 1989. Likely to make you bristle with indignant fury.
From Friday 31 May, Netflix

Historical Roasts

Having lobbed devastating putdowns in the direction of everyone from Charlie Sheen to Donald Trump, the insult comic know as the “Roastmaster General”, Jeff Ross, trawls through the annals for some new targets in this Netflix comedy series. Historical Roasts sees Ross and guest comedians rip into historical figures, from Abraham Lincoln to Jimi Hendrix. It’s more fun if they can’t answer back …
From Monday 31c May, Netflix



The world is round… Brian Cox. Photograph: Martin Johnson

The Planets

As time goes on, Brian Cox is becoming a more convincing, less distractingly demonstrative presenter, and his gift for explaining the almost inexplicable remains intact. In this new series, he tells the story of the solar system. Expect your mind to be boggled.
Tuesday 28 May, 9pm, BBC Two

Klopp vs Poch: Battle of the Supermanagers

Ahead of an all-English Champions League final, the personable Peter Crouch runs the rule over the two remarkable foreign managers who have created this singularity of English footballing success. He talks to players, fans and managers in an attempt to learn their secrets.
Thursday 30 May, 10pm, Channel 4

The Warwick University Rape Chat Scandal

A grim but necessary insight into a culture of sexism and misogyny at Warwick University. This doc reports on the fallout of the discovery of a Facebook group in which male students made rape threats. A corrective to anyone sneering about snowflakes and safe spaces.
From Tuesday 28 May, BBC Three



In the nick of time… Assault On Precinct 13. Photograph: Miracle/Kobal/REX/Shutterstock

Assault on Precinct 13

John Carpenter’s 1976 thriller-cum-cult masterpiece transposes Howard Hawks’s Rio Bravo to modern LA, with a motley crew of cops and crooks besieged in a police station by a street gang of crazies coming on like extras from Night of the Living Dead. Murky photography and Carpenter’s own soundtrack set the edgy tone for a generation of action/horror movies.
Friday 31 May, 1.55am, Film4

Good Omens

The portents augur well for Amazon’s technicolour fantasy saga. It is adapted by Neil Gaiman from his and Terry Pratchett’s cult novel, and the premise – a roguish demon (David Tennant) and a squeaky-clean angel (Michael Sheen) team up to stop the end of the world – is agreeably loopy. All that plus Benedict Cumberbatch as a cartoon Satan.
From Friday 31 May, Amazon Prime Video

Game of Thrones Star Charles Dance Didn’t Love the Show’s Ending

Documentaries have grown considerably more ambitious since Fred Ott’s Sneeze, an 1894 clip that documents the irritated sinus cavities of its subject in just five seconds. They can inspire, as in the case of 2019’s Academy Award-winning Free Solo, about bold mountain climber Alex Honnold. They can shine a light on cultural overachievers like Fred Rogers, the subject of 2018’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor? And they can parse political history, with films like 2003’s The Fog of War shedding light on decisions that shaped the world.

Other documentaries set out to chronicle true stories that, were they presented as a fictitious, might be hard for people to believe. We’ve profiled such films in previous lists, which you can find here, here, and here. If you’ve already made your way through those tales of cannibals, tragic love affairs, and twist-laden true

Read more at: http://mentalfloss.com/article/583962/game-of-thrones-charles-dance-disappointed-with-finale