Category Archives: True Crime Books

Local writer unveils darker history in new book

Local writer and true murder buff Jim Baumgratz, of St. Marys, recently released “Elk County Murders Mysterious Deaths” –– a book that might prompt Nosferatu to check his closet at night.

Based solely on true crimes, the book is a compilation of 25 murders and mysterious deaths committed in Elk County that took place in locations such as Ridgway, Johnsonburg, St. Marys, Kersey, Wilcox and many more.

Baumgratz cited his inspiration for creating the book by explaining, “Back in 1999 I read the rare book Tiger at the Bar and was fascinated by the stories of the prohibition era in Bradford as well as local stories of murders and mayhem within Elk County etc. that were covered in this book.”

He explained the book was so expensive and hard to find that he ended up reprinting it.

“I found the content of local crime history fascinating and I wanted

Read more at: http://www.bradfordera.com/lifestyles/local-writer-unveils-darker-history-in-new-book/article_6d9091c6-895e-11e8-bd32-ff8469c09b3d.html

‘I’ll Be Gone In The Dark’ is as educational as it is chilling and gripping

In 1984, in the village of Oak Park, Illinois, the United States, a young woman was violently raped and killed after being dragged into an alleyway by a mysterious murderer.

The public’s fascination with the brutal murder faded with time, but one 14-year-old girl remained gripped by the case: She had handled crime scene evidence, pieces of a shattered Walkman that had been worn by the victim just prior to her death.

For the young Michelle McNamara, the gruesome experience sparked what she later described as “a murder habit” that would see her spend hours poring over true crime stories, driven by an obsession to remove the anonymities of monstrous murderers who could disappear without a trace.

For the amateur crime sleuth, it was the anonymity that gave murders power over the authorities and victims’ families. She wanted desperately to eliminate this power and help provide some sense of closure for the people

Read more at: https://www.star2.com/culture/2018/07/17/golden-state-serial-murderer-review/

Murderer Caught Thanks In Part To True Crime Book | Star2.com

In 1984, in the village of Oak Park, Illinois, the United States, a young woman was violently raped and killed after being dragged into an alleyway by a mysterious murderer.

The public’s fascination with the brutal murder faded with time, but one 14-year-old girl remained gripped by the case: She had handled crime scene evidence, pieces of a shattered Walkman that had been worn by the victim just prior to her death.

For the young Michelle McNamara, the gruesome experience sparked what she later described as “a murder habit” that would see her spend hours poring over true crime stories, driven by an obsession to remove the anonymities of monstrous murderers who could disappear without a trace.

For the amateur crime sleuth, it was the anonymity that gave murders power over the authorities and victims’ families. She wanted desperately to eliminate this power and help provide some sense of closure for the people

Read more at: https://www.star2.com/culture/2018/07/17/golden-state-serial-murderer-review/

The Book That Terrified Neil Gaiman. And Carmen Maria Machado. And Dan Simmons.

Neil Gaiman, author of “Norse Mythology”

“Pet Sematary” by Stephen King

“Pet Sematary,” by Stephen King. I got it as a gift when I was 11 or 12. I remember being so scared reading it that I threw the book away from me as if it were a poisonous insect. For the first time I felt a physical sensation with literature. It’s so dark, so brutal. It’s also very scary: the utter hopelessness, the way King just doesn’t offer any relief.

Mariana Enriquez, author of “Things We Lost in the Fire”

“Come Closer” by Sara Gran

In the fall of 2001, I was working by myself on a weekend afternoon at a mystery bookstore in Greenwich Village. Traffic was slow and I had some downtime to read Sara Gran’s “Come Closer,” which one

Read more at: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/16/books/review/author-recommended-scary-books.html

Crime fiction round-up: astute Brexit analogy in a ‘Wicker Man’ setting

Martyn Waites is the author of a number of powerful novels under his own name and a commercially successful set of books under the pseudonym Tania Carver. With The Old Religion (Zaffre, £12.99) he is back to himself and at the beginning of a new series featuring former undercover cop Tom Kilgannon, who is in the witness protection programme, hiding out in a bleak Cornish village: “Hardly anyone came to St Petroc who didn’t live there. And hardly anyone came to live there.” When a 17-year-old runaway from the local new age travellers’ commune breaks into his house and steals the wallet containing the details of his new identity, Kilgannon finds himself embroiled in a case that spirals from a missing boy to a Wicker Man-style eruption of witchcraft and ritual magic. Waites deftly plaits the traditional elements of the detective story with the occasionally ripe but often chilling

Read more at: https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/crime-fiction-round-up-astute-brexit-analogy-in-a-wicker-man-setting-1.3556623

Bookstore Owner Authors “The Leopold and Loeb Files”

Nina Barrett, co-owner of Bookends Beginnings, an independent bookstore in Evanston, Illinois, dissects a range of primary sources in the forthcoming true crime book The Leopold and Loeb Files: An Intimate Look at One of America’s Most Infamous Crimes (Agate Midway, July 17).

The titular case, once dubbed “the crime of the century,” was the kidnapping and murder of 14-year-old Bobby Franks by University of Chicago college students Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb in the summer of 1924. After the young men were arrested, a dramatic interrogation period and trial ensued, with celebrity defense attorney Clarence Darrow stepping in to save the boys from the death penalty.

Barrett came up with the idea for the book when, working part-time doing publicity for the Northwestern University Library while attending culinary school, she found what she thought was the most fascinating series of items related to the case in the library’s collection. The 2009 exhibit

Read more at: http://www.bookweb.org/news/bookstore-owner-authors-leopold-and-loeb-files-104798

Emma Roberts’s Book Club Picked Two Books For July & One Is About Our Obsession With Dead Girls

With everyone from Oprah and Reese Witherspoon to Emma Watson and Lena Dunham starting their own groups, it seems like nowadays there are more celebrity book clubs than one reader could possibly join, but if you want to join in on a community that recommends fierce and feminist reads, look no further than Belletrist. This month, Emma Roberts’s book club picked not one, but two nonfiction titles for July, and trust me when I say both books should be considered required summer reading.

Every month, over 178,000 followers tune into the Belletrist Instagram page to see what the Scream Queens actress and her best friend and book club cofounder Karah Preiss are reading. This July, bookworms were treated to two incredible selections, both nonfiction and both totally engrossing reads.

First up: Alice Bolin’s Dead Girls: Essays on Surviving

Read more at: https://www.bustle.com/p/emma-robertss-book-club-picked-two-books-for-july-one-is-about-our-obsession-with-dead-girls-9725239

The Best Books on Con Artists, According to True-Crime Experts

Photo: Courtesy DreamWorks Pictures

Welcome to Reading Lists, comprehensive book guides from the Strategist designed to make you an expert (or at least a fascinating dinner-party companion) in hyperspecific or newsworthy topics like microdosing, cults, or North Korea. Here, we’ve rounded up the best books on legendary con artists and infamous scams throughout history.

It’s the summer of scam. New York writer Jessica Pressler exposed the shocking story of Anna Delvey; John Carreyrou’s book Bad Blood hit the best-seller list, chronicling the rise and fall of biotech start-up Theranos and its founder, Elizabeth Holmes. If you’re hungry

Read more at: http://nymag.com/strategist/article/best-con-artist-books.html