Monthly Archives: January 2016

TV Review: ‘The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story’

Nobody needs to apply spoiler warnings to “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.” Arresting from the get-go, the performances in this limited series are almost uniformly superb (with one glaring exception), and dealing with a true story imposes a level of discipline and restraint on producer Ryan Murphy and his collaborators that’s become a rarity in his other shows. Although “People v. O.J.” commits a few minor fumbles, almost everyone here has acquitted themselves honorably, in roles that, for the most part, fit them like a glove.

Adding context to the eventual not-guilty verdict, the series opens with the Rodney King beating and the civil unrest that followed. That distrust toward the police and justice system in the African-American community would ultimately become a vital part of the case, albeit one that prosecutors clearly underestimated in everything from their handling of jury selection to

Read more at: https://variety.com/2016/tv/reviews/the-people-v-o-j-simpson-american-crime-story-review-fx-john-travolta-cuba-gooding-jr-ryan-murphy-1201684402/

True crime documentaries on Netflix: 22 chilling shows to binge watch

Netflix has us completely and utterly hooked on the true crime genre, serving us so many documentaries it’s hard to will yourself to walk away from your screen.

Home to some of the best TV series on offer, the on-demand service is spoiling our best (or worst) spectator-selves rotten. Since the release of Making A Murderer had us all gripped to our armchairs, convinced we knew better than police, juries and supreme court judges, Netflix hasn’t left us empty-handed. Oh no, there’s plenty more true crime on offer.

From the absolutely unbelievable pizza heist of Evil Genius to the alluring strength of the cult in Wild Wild Country, the eye-opening family-focussed The Staircase to the unnerving The Confession Tapes that will have you questioning your own mind, here’s

Read more at: https://www.glamourmagazine.co.uk/gallery/crime-documentaries-netflix

True crime author sees holes in Entwistle murder case

Duncan McNab has a lot of experience dealing with major crimes.

He is a former detective in both England and Australia and has written several true crime novels including “Outlaw Bikers in Australia” and “Above the Law.” And now, McNab is considering writing a novel on what he calls a mystery – the Neil Entwistle murder case.

“It’s one of those bloody mysteries you can’t put out of your mind,” McNab said last week. “I keep seeing reasonable doubt.”

Authorities say Entwistle, then 27, shot and killed his wife Rachel, 27, and their 9-month-old daughter Lillian Rose, on Jan. 20, 2006. They say he stole a gun from his in-laws’ Carver home, used it to murder his wife and daughter and then returned it to Carver. A Middlesex Superior Court jury convicted Entwistle of their murders in 2008 and he is serving life in prison without the possibility of parole.

But, McNab said he

Read more at: http://www.wcvb.com/article/true-crime-author-sees-holes-in-entwistle-murder-case/8230732

‘Making a Murderer’ filmmakers say they expected backlash

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — The filmmakers behind Netflix’s “Making a
Murderer” documentary say they expected a backlash that would
lead people in the media to demonize Steven Avery, the Wisconsin
man whose prosecution in the 2005 death of a woman formed the
centerpiece of the 10-part series issued last month.

Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, at a news conference on Sunday,
sought to deflect discussion on the question of Avery’s guilt or
innocence and instead pointed to questions raised about the
criminal justice system in their film.

“Making a Murderer” has followed the NPR podcast “Serial” and
HBO’s “The Jinx” as a compellingly told true crime epic, leading
many people who have seen it to take up the cause of Avery, who
served 18 years in

Read more at: http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-making-a-murderer-filmmakers-say-they-expected-backlash-2016-1

True crime author sees holes in Entwistle murder case

A former detective questions Neil Entwistle’s murder conviction.

Duncan McNab has a lot of experience dealing with major crimes.

He is a former detective in both England and Australia and has written several true crime novels including “Outlaw Bikers in Australia” and “Above the Law.” And now, McNab is considering writing a novel on what he calls a mystery – the Neil Entwistle murder case.

“It’s one of those bloody mysteries you can’t put out of your mind,” McNab said last week. “I keep seeing reasonable doubt.”

Authorities say Entwistle, then 27, shot and killed his wife Rachel, 27, and their 9-month-old daughter Lillian Rose, on Jan. 20, 2006. They say he stole a gun from his in-laws’ Carver home, used it to murder his wife and daughter and then returned it to Carver. A Middlesex Superior Court jury convicted Entwistle of their murders in 2008 and he is serving life in prison

Read more at: https://www.metrowestdailynews.com/article/20160117/NEWS/160116575

Nancy Grace declares war on ‘Making a Murderer’

Nancy Grace is angry – or make that angrier than usual – over “Making a Murderer,” the 10-part Netflix documentary series, which left a clear impression that Steven Avery had possibly been wrongly convicted of murder, with an assist from local media and crime-oriented talking heads, none more so than Grace. So the HLN host is exacting vengeance as only she can, on Thursday by airing a special devoted to the case, “Caught On Tape: Steven Avery Guilty?,” following her appearance pushing the same theme on sister network CNN’s “Reliable Sources.”

Grace promised that she would deliver “an avalanche of evidence” pointing toward Avery’s guilt, while dismissing “Making a Murderer” as a “so-called documentary aimed at setting a killer free.” Yet the avalanche turned out to be more like a sprinkling of pebbles, peppered with the host’s unique blend of righteous indignation and

Read more at: http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/tv/ct-nancy-grace-making-a-murderer-20160115-story.html

Making a Murderer: Steven Avery is ‘not innocent’, says ex-fiancee Jodi Stachowski

The ex-fiancee of Steven Avery – the subject of Netflix’s true crime series Making a Murderer – has said he is guilty.

Jodi Stachowski has given an interview to an American TV channel saying her support for Avery – who was convicted of the 2005 murder of photographer Teresa Halbach in Wisconsin – in the documentary was “all an act”.

She told HLN she believed he was “not innocent” because “he threatened to kill [her] and [her] family and a friend of [hers]” in the past. 

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When asked why he threatened her she said it was because “he was sick”. 

Describing her former fiance as a “monster” she said she had asked documentary makers not to use footage of her in the

Read more at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/making-a-murderer-steven-avery-is-not-innocent-of-teresa-halbachs-murder-says-ex-fiancee-jodi-a6812411.html

The Mad Chopper: One Cut Was Not Enough

Since the case took place in the same county as Lobster Boy had, it immediately attracted me. That is, until I read further and discovered that Singleton was notorious in Northern California, where he had, years before, kidnapped a teenager, took her to a remote area outside Modesto, raped her and cut her arms off.

Read more at: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-lineup/the-mad-chopper-one-cut-w_b_8986194.html

True-crime author tackles Laura Ackerson death, dismemberment

Author Diane Fanning has again found an intriguing and disturbing Triangle story to tell.

Fanning, who lives in Virginia, wrote the definitive account of the Michael Peterson case with her 2005 book “Written in Blood.” Her 14th true-crime book, “Bitter Remains: A Custody Battle, a Gruesome Crime, and the Mother Who Paid the Ultimate Price” (Berkley, 416 pages) was released last week.

The book chronicles how a contentious custody fight led to the grisly death and dismemberment of Kinston’s Laura Jean Ackerson, a 27-year-old entrepreneur and graphic artist. Ackerson was last seen alive when she visited the Raleigh apartment of Grant and Amanda Hayes on July 13, 2011, to pick up her two sons from Grant, their father and her former boyfriend.

Ackerson’s chopped up remains were found in a creek near Richmond, Texas, later that month, leading Grant and Amanda Hayes to be charged, then

Read more at: https://www.wral.com/true-crime-author-tackles-laura-ackerson-death-dismemberment/15229669/