Monthly Archives: November 2015

True-crime author’s lessons learned – The San Diego Union

Caitlin Rother spent almost 20 years working as a newspaper reporter, including 13 with the Union-Tribune, before turning to true-crime books.

Her newest, “Then No One Can Have Her,” is about the 2008 bludgeon murder in Prescott, Arizona, of Carol Kennedy, a therapist and teacher. Her ex-husband was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

Rother will be at the La Jolla Riford Library Saturday at 4:30 p.m. and at the Women’s Museum of California in Point Loma on Dec. 13 at 4 p.m.

Q: Why are you drawn to these kinds of stories?

FX Sets Winter Premiere Dates for ‘American Crime Story,’ ‘Baskets,’ Other Series

FX Networks on Thursday announced winter premiere dates for some new and returning series, including a Tuesday timeslot for limited series “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson.”

The networks kick off their winter programming with the FXX return of comedies “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and “Men Seeking Woman” on Wednesday, Jan. 6. “Sunny,” the longest-running series in FX Networks history, opens its 11th season at 10 p.m., followed by “Men” at 10:30 p.m. for its second season.

Zach Galifianakis’ new comedy “Baskets” will premiere Thursday, Jan. 21 at 10 on FX. The show follows Chip Baskets (Galifianakis) in his dream of being a French clown — however, reality keeps interfering.

The much-anticipated “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson” will bow Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 10 on FX. Based on the book “The Run of His Life: The People V. O.J. Simpson” by Jeffrey

Read more at: https://variety.com/2015/tv/news/fx-sets-winter-premiere-dates-1201639243/

Blood Ties

After testifying at Soering’s trial, Haysom underwent a kind of molting. She quit smoking, and enrolled in a computer-aided design course at the prison. She got certified by the American Drafting Design Association, and began to teach the course; some of her students went on to do drafting work for Boeing. When she was transferred to a new prison, Fluvanna, in 1998, the CAD program moved with her.

At Fluvanna, Haysom learned to train rescue dogs. She began approaching her human students as if they were fearful animals; her favorites were the ones who hated school, because she enjoyed flipping them. In 2007, she was certified as a Braille transcriber and started Brailling books. At the moment, she is finishing her bachelor’s degree through an Ohio

Read more at: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/11/09/blood-ties